Ayesha Siddika

Ayesha Siddika

Profile

I am thrived to understand the intrinsic relationship between religion and socio-political phenomenon. Currently my doctorate degree at the School of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds explores the causes of the Rohingya refugee crisis. Precisely, I would like to understand how religion is a driving factor behind the crisis.

Before starting my PhD, I have completed my BA (hons) and MA in World Religions and Culture from the University of Dhaka in 2013 and 2015 respectively. Besides studying major religions of the world, I studied courses including Sociology, Politics, History and Sociology of Religion which have  immensely inspired me to  pursue my higher studies in the School of Sociology and Social Policy. I have received two important awards for my academic contribution; Khaleda Manzoor i Khuda Gold Medal from the President of Bangladesh in 2017 and the Deans Award  for securing the first position in the Department of World Religions and Culture, University of Dhaka. As a reputed institution, Dhaka University has also facilitated me to engage with co-curricular activities during my University life.

I have been serving as a full time faculty member at the Department of World Religions and Culture, University of Dhaka since 2017. Currently I am on study leave for pursuing my PhD. 

Research interests

My current doctoral project explores the causes of the Rohingya refugee crisis. The Rohingyas, over a million in number, were compelled to take shelter in Bangladesh after a brutal military crackdown back in 2017 in Myanmar. Till today, the crisis has not been given enough concentration by the international community to bring to an end. My research will try to understand- a. the general factors behind the crisis and b. to what extent religion plays a vital role in making of the crisis. Apart from studying refugee and migration, I am also interested in religion and politics. 

Qualifications

  • MA in World Religions and Culture
  • BA (hons) in World Religions and Culture